Fujifilm GFX 50S Camera Handling

Fujifilm GFX 50S Camera Handling

Fujifilm GFX 50S is a medium-format camera with lighter weight and it appears to be the opening impression of everyone who pick up the GFX 50S for the first time. The light weight is fine, but it is not the point to discuss about. Mostly we are interested in the model the is housing such a huge sensor inside, it is not too bad at all. Fuji equipped the SLR-shaped GFX with an SLR-style grip that makes the camera handle like it is smaller. The GFX is more like a Nikon D610 than a gargantuan Pentax 645Z.

A large grip of GFX 50S makes it feel comfortable in the hand, and of course gives it that air of quality. Along the side of the GFX 50S are more hatches and flaps than a submarine. On the right side behind the grip is a door that hides the twin SD card slots. You will find a door for a big, boxy battery, and a smaller one for the camera’s USB, remote and HDMI ports on the opposite side of the camera. The clever detail of GFX is that its badge inset into this door is yet another smaller door, enabling even convenient access to the remote socket. This camera’s controls consist of twin dials on the front and back of the camera. There is a comfortable rear rubber grip flares out, making a nook for your thumb to rest in, counterbalancing the front grip. Buttons on the rear are similar to those on either of Fuji’s recent flagship, and there is also a handy nubbin for selecting as AF point. The GFX 50S has a viewfinder attached on it, but this can be removed to make the camera smaller and lighter. With most professional cameras, it is possibly no one ever dreamt of taking off the viewfinder, but for a model that may be used in a studio environment, mounted to a tripod, using only the screen may make sense. The good news is the viewfinder will come in the box, so you won’t have to fork out even more cash to get one.

The screen on the rear of the camera also tilts, which again will help with shooting angles, and its touch-sensitive too. With some additional dials to control shutter speed and ISO on either side of the protruding electric viewfinder. A top LCD shows information at a glance, while the power button surrounds the shutter button. Sitting atop the camera there is a shutter speed dial and an ISO dial. If you want to change aperture, you can use rings on the lenses themselves – three will be available from launch, with a further three coming before the end of 2017.